About the Economic Sociology Seminar

Inaugurated at the MIT Sloan School of Management in 1997, the Economic Sociology Seminar aims to be the home for cutting-edge economic sociology in the greater Boston social science research community. Since 2003, the seminar has been jointly run by faculty from the Sloan School's Economic Sociology Program and the Harvard Department of Sociology. Meeting at MIT and Harvard in alternating weeks during the academic year, presenters and participants represent a diverse array of theoretical perspectives and methodological approaches. What we share is a commitment to engage the array of research that has recently come under the heading of economic sociology and thereby to improve upon existing models of organizations, markets, and other key economic institutions.

The workshop meets bi-weekly on Wednesdays throughout the academic year. The Harvard workshops take place in William James Hall 1550 from 4:00-5:30PM unless otherwise noted. 

Schedule for MIT Economic Sociology Seminar Meetings

 

Upcoming Events

2021 Oct 13

Noah Askin (INSEAD)

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

WJH 1550

The Collaboration-Association Tradeoff: How The Gender Composition Of Networks And Genres Influence Artist Creativity

While creative production is widely recognized as a collective endeavor, scholarship on gender and creativity has primarily focused on individual-level gender differences in creative ability and evaluations of creative output. In this paper, we explore how the gender composition of artists’ social worlds—the collaborators with whom they interact, and the other artists with whom they are associated through shared genre membership—influences...

Read more about Noah Askin (INSEAD)
2021 Oct 27

Daniel Schneider (Harvard Kennedy School)

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

WJH 1550

The Consequences of Unemployment for Service Sector Workers in the U.S. during COVID-19

The COVID19 pandemic caused a sharp negative shock to employment that was concentrated in the service sector. Yet, the pandemic recession was also met by an uncharacteristically generous social safety net response in the United States. A rich and longstanding literature examines the effects of unemployment on individual wellbeing. The COVID19 recession presents a key site to advance this literature by deploying stronger causal estimation strategies and by leveraging the...

Read more about Daniel Schneider (Harvard Kennedy School)
2021 Nov 10

Gru Han (Harvard Sociology)

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

WJH 1550

Corporate Stratification and Income Inequality in the United States, 1950-2018

American corporate world is often depicted with dynamic and creative disruptions of established orders. There are constant falls of old incumbents and rises of new companies, long represented by the term “creative destruction” by Schumpeter. However, if one looks at the data during the second half of the 20th century and especially the last two decades, the picture is not too vibrant and dynamic. This research shows that the opposite picture seems to be more accurate: now we...

Read more about Gru Han (Harvard Sociology)
2021 Dec 01

Katharina Fellnhofer (ETH Zurich/Harvard Sociology)

4:00pm to 5:30pm

Location: 

WJH 1550

A Female Myth? Measuring Intuitive Decision Making and its Gender Differences

Despite the complexity of measuring intuitive decision making, it is enjoying increased attention in the scientific community. We make decisions based on two complementary but dissimilar cognitive processes, and just as our analytical processes do not guarantee rational decision making, nor do intuitive processes automatically produce irrational decisions. However, our knowledge of intuitive decision making and its successful interplay with its analytical counterpart remains in...

Read more about Katharina Fellnhofer (ETH Zurich/Harvard Sociology)